Tag Archives: Wire Taps

FISA in the time of Cholera

gman

I recently came across a Yale Law Journal Note from 2003 entitled Leaving FISA Behind: The need to return to warrantless foreign intelligence surveillance. It is brilliantly researched and worth the read for the footnotes alone. I utterly disagree with its underlying sentiment, although not necessarily the mandate of its title.

FISA is a statutory mechanism, designed by congress, to entrench the footnoted warrant exception for national security espoused in Katz v. United States, 389 U.S. 347 (1967). By virtue of the FISA laws, domestic surveillance conducted for national security reasons involving foreign powers or their agents is reviewed by a 21st century star chamber, a tribunal of three that meets in secret within the DOJ in D.C. and determines whether or not to issue a FISA warrant with only pro forma appellate review. The standard is a watered-down version of probable cause. The court’s actions are functionally isolated from criminal discovery, and are generally unknowable. Because of these peculiarities, it is difficult to even trust the government when it represents that no FISA material was utilized in apprehending or prosecuting a defendant. After all, that is what you’d say if you’re tasked with protecting the reasoning of a secret tribunal and the existence of a secret warrant.

The article’s conclusions are necessarily naive. The article predates Edward Snowden, the Darkest of the Iraq war scandals, the abuses of the CIA in Guantanamo and black sites, changes to the text of the Patriot Act in 2015, and the election of Donald Trump. I feel that the author’s first conclusion – that the authorization of these questions should return to Article III courts – is perfectly valid. Such a shift would end a practice that, I feel, violates the right to an open court, and improve the chances of meaningful judicial review of Fourth Amendment challenges in the courts. The author’s second conclusion, however, I cannot endorse. Given the “red tape” and “procedural hurdles” that Article III warrant applications typically require, the author suggests that such surveillance be conducted without a warrant, subject only to a reasonableness inquiry. While she is correct that the warrant requirement has eroded beyond recognition, it is foolish to believe that the answer should be to lessen the burden on the government moving forward. Yes, the Freedom Act made some useful modifications to the FISA rules, but these modifications were largely half measures. For example, Section 301 of the Freedom Act prevents the use of evidence obtained by means of “deficient” procedures from being received in a trial, but the question of deficiency is still largely not subject to review outside of the FISA court system. Although this system is more transparent now than it was in 2003, it lacks the robustness of true appellate review.

Better to end FISA entirely, as the author suggests, and subject all foreign surveillance to the same strictures as Title III wiretaps.

Leaving FISA Behind: The Need to Return to Warrantless Foreign Intelligence Surveillance

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